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MPLS

MPLS - Multi-Protocol Label Switching for Scaling

There is an obvious benefit to using a VPN service at the corporate level. The security gain is massive, but to what extent are you willing to sacrifice speed for security? Luckily you don't have to with MPLS (Multi-Protocol Label Switching) active on your VPN service.

There is an obvious benefit to using a VPN service at the corporate level. The security gain is massive, but to what extent are you willing to sacrifice speed for security? Luckily you don't have to with MPLS (Multi-Protocol Label Switching) active on your VPN service.

MPLS is simply a method of routing traffic through a VPN faster than the typical method using the OSI model. MPLS assigns a tag to all points of communication and then routes them to specific IP addresses based on the tag attached. Tagging is much faster as it ignores the packet inspection phase of the process and sends it to its destination. To fully take advantage of MPLS routing, your network will need to have one of the two identifiers; a set range of IP addresses or an AS number (autonomous system) to correctly tag locations on the network. Let's break down further some options enterprise have when choosing MPLS with there VPN service.

Point to Point

Point to point MPLS typically refers to layer two connectivity to endpoint devices used on an internal backbone network. Devices like ATMs, badge readers, or control units in which their activity remains constant would be the best use of point to point VPN using MPLS. The only concern with point to point is network latency can increase as your network grows because the number of point connections will continue to increase. At this time is when you might consider switching over to a VPLS VPN service to account for the load.

VPLS

Another layer 2 MPLS method would be VPLS (virtual private LAN service). VPLS is typically used for going across multiple VLANS to ensure speed and secure connectivity in the enterprise realm. Most companies use VPLS to connect telecommunications and video services between office buildings or datacenter locations. These types of communication require a high level of bandwidth to provide successful transmissions.

VPRN

Last but certainly not least we have a Layer 3 compensating protocol with VPRN (virtual private routed network). VPRN is primarily used to route communications from remote or peer users to a centralized location. Out of the three subprotocols within MPLS, it is one of the most difficult to get spun up and running effectively. Most entities that utilize MPLS VPRN have a global presence that requires high connectivity and securability.

Overall, the MPLS protocol allows enterprises the freedom to direct and route their communications as they want to provide the speeds needed to satisfy their specific business need. MPLS provides alternative routing options outside of your typical OSI model layer 2 and layer three protocols. If you are interested in learning more or want to get an alternative VPN routing solution implemented in your custom network, contact the professionals at RingVPN to learn more. Inquire about how MPLS can help increase connectivity while properly securing your communications.